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Teachers and non-teaching staff of SSCBS continue to protest, as they have still not received their salaries and it has disrupted their personal lives.

The last time I paid my home’s E.M.I. was in November because that’s the last time I was paid my salary,

– said Dr. Narander Kumar Nigam, who is a professor at Shaheed Sukhdev College of Business Studies (SSCBS).

Professors, along with the non-teaching staff, have not been paid their salaries for the past three months. Due to this, everyone, including the students, is facing issues at the college. SSCBS is one of the 12 Delhi University (DU) colleges that finds itself amidst the ongoing row between the Delhi government and DU.

Due to the non-payment of salaries, teachers are under massive financial stress. Dr. Nigam enumerated how it has become difficult to go about their everyday lives. Professors are unable to pay their children’s fees, loans, or medical bills. Dr. Nigam stated that he had to borrow money from his relatives, even though both he and his wife are employed.

When I am doing everything that I am expected to do, from taking classes to evaluating papers, then why am I not paid for that work?

– Dr. Narander Kumar Nigam, professor, SSCBS

Ayush, a student of SSCBS, also explained that it is very taxing for the professors to take classes under such circumstances. He further noted that this is not the first time such a thing has happened. Dr. Nigam, too, noted that this is a consistent thing that they have been experiencing since the pandemic.

People have to take loans just to meet their daily needs or clear medical bills.

– Ayush, a student of SSCBS

Further, as per Dr. Nigam, the faculty strength at the moment is 22, but the sanctioned strength is 44. Moreover, he explained that, as per University Grants Commission (UGC) guidelines, the strength should have been around 70. SSCBS has around 50 societies and 20 committees, and it is becoming difficult to manage all of them.

Sirf 22 faculty members ke saath, ek teacher kitna sambhal sakta hai? (There are only 22 faculty members; how much can one teacher handle?)

-Dr. Narander Kumar Nigam, professor, SSCBS

Professors at SSCBS have been protesting against the situation. However, they have collectively made sure that the students should not suffer, and till now no class has been suspended, though they claimed that the emotional stress of it all continues to be present among both the students and the teachers. Given the fact that the final semester students will be appearing for their final exams in less than three months, professors continue to take all the classes.

The students of SSCBS have shown their solidarity with the teachers. According to Ayush, on February 12, the student council of the college urged everyone to wear black as a “symbolic gesture” to show their solidarity.

Teachers have been protesting every day at the college. Dr. Nigam claimed that the teachers protest only during their free time so that students are not affected. As per the students, this may be one of the reasons that people outside the college are under the impression that the “protest” may not be serious.

Students of the college also feel that significant steps towards making the problem known have not been taken due to its location. Ujjwal, a student at SSCBS, has expressed that, though SSCBS is an off-campus college, it has charted good ranks for itself. But, due to its location, the ongoing situation at the college has not yet come to light.

If it were a college on North Campus, the situation would have garnered attention.

–  Ujjwal, student of SSCBS

Furthermore, as per a statement by the Delhi government in January, it will release the funds to the 12 DU colleges only when they are de-affiliated to become a part of Delhi’s state universities. However, the students at SSCBS feel very differently about this.

The mindset of the students at SSCBS is different. Apart from wanting to get the “DU degree,” we want the college to stay under DU because a college like SSCBS should be associated with a name that can justify its stature. All the students and the professors here have worked hard to build up the institution’s name. We cannot accept going under the Delhi government

-Expressed Vasu, a student of SSCBS.

Nevertheless, as per the students, the emotional turmoil that the professors are undergoing has led to irregularities in how and what is being taught in classes. Ujjwal expressed:

Though the teachers are doing their best, sometimes they come to class, share their experience, and leave.

Dr. Nigam further shared that when they take classes, it is very difficult for a teacher to keep their emotions or things that are going around in their minds outside the class. Though the principal of the college is sympathetic towards the issues and has allegedly asked the teachers to continue their classes, both the students and the teachers are under immense emotional duress. Students and teachers at SSCBS have a lot of concern for the reputation and the educational quality that their college commands. However, things look dull as teachers and non-teaching staff continue the protest for their salaries.

Read Also: DU’s Voice on Fest Advisory: Critical Concerns Raised

Featured Image Credits: Student Council of SSCBS

DUTA Demands Release of Salaries and Other Dues

Ankita Baidya

[email protected]

Good-byes are the hardest; even harder with our professors. But what do we do when we find ourselves amidst the ad-hoc crisis?

What does college life mean to us? Does it mean romanticizing the red-brick walls? Or does it mean romanticizing the kurta– tote bag- chai inner core? Whatever it means, it surely stands for something unique for each of us. However, amidst the beauty of this chaos, lies a hard feeling of being lost, a feeling that could only be felt as words fall short to describe it. But how did we land up to this position? Is it because of the cute little fights over lunch breaks or are those never-ending assignments to be blamed? To be fair here, I feel these are the memories we take along with us and the reason to feel lost has another story behind it.

When we transition from school to college, we bring along a bag full of expectations. Apart from to-be-realized life-long friendships, we do expect to find mentors and guides who would not just be limited to the pale-yellow walled classroom but would bring solace when life happens to us. However, what happens if the “academic universe” decides to take them away from you? What happens when you find yourself alone again? What happens when you get the guidance you yearned for only to realize it to exist for a short-run? This is what it feels when we encounter the issue of ad-hoc displacement.

Currently, the Delhi University (DU) is underway with hirings for permanent positions. According to a report by Indian Express, as of April 2023, 4500-5000 permanent positions were to be filled and by then 100-150 ad-hoc teachers were already displaced in the process. The interview process for filling of the permanent posts began in the later half of 2022.

To give you a jest of how these applications are processed; the interviews are taken by a selection committee. Under the University Grants Commission (UGC) Regulations, this committee comprises of the principal of the college; the chairperson of the college’s governing body, or their nominee; the head of the department in charge of the subject; two V-C nominees; two external subject matter experts; and, in the event that any other members of the selection committee do not fall into one of these categories, an academician representing the SC, ST, OBC, minority communities, women, or differently abled categories.

If we go by the text-book, everything looks clean. However, I find myself incapable of judging whether things are fair or not. Due to this paucity, I will only be presenting you all with facts and figures and perhaps the questions that loom in every corner of my mind.

Recently, the sociology department of Indraprastha College for Women (IPCW) went through a whirlpool when five ad-hoc professors of the department, who were teaching at the college since years, all of a sudden found themselves out of job as the list with (new) permanent teachers was released. In a similar fashion, a (former) ad-hoc teacher, Pankaj Sarma of Kirori Mal College, suddenly found himself jobless, though he gave his ten years to the institution.

Similarly, late Samarveer of Hindu College, died by suicide as told by his family member due to his sudden removal from his job. Samarveer was an ad-hoc professor in the Philosophy department of the college. You name a college and this is the same story spinning everywhere.

To pin point here, if you get a sudden news that your professor resigned, it could either be that they finally understood what is about to unfold and voluntarily resigned or they met their fates of getting displaced. As sad as this reality would sound, this is what has been happening in the institution that is supposed to nurture the next-generation leaders, changemakers, and thinkers.

Even though I try to reel out of the pain of losing a mentor who not just guided me through the dreadful semester exams but showed me what I am capable of, what more I can achieve, and how much more power is to be realized as we move ahead in our lives, I stand dejected to know that my guiding light may have lost their shine. Though I know they are better-off and a place like this may not deserve them but I also know how blessed the students were to have a person like them in their lives. No words could give anyone a “job-security,” especially for a job they love. But as I come to the end, I could only hope to meet them again, perhaps while discussing our next adventure together.

Read Also: Social Media Vilification of Nerd Archetype

Featured Image Credits: The Quint

Ankita Baidya

[email protected]

 

DU politics can be seldom described as “Chacha Vidhayak hain humare,” but no one is interested in addressing the people they are about to serve, or at least promise to serve.

Try describing Delhi University (DU), and you will realise that politics is inseparable from it. When we turn the pages of history, we see DU emerge as a political hub that we never knew existed. These pages of history stand as proof that the protest culture, which is still so ingrained in DU students, emerges from a time where all that mattered was the notion of freedom, and to live and breathe independently. However, in 2023, all of this can be described as “bigoted irony.”

And as we take a sip of tea, here we are, days away from experiencing the Delhi University Students’ Union (DUSU) elections, which are back after a hiatus of three years. While all the organisations are busy preparing for it, however nobody is actually dwelling on the reason behind these elections.

Being one of the greatest democracies in the world, “democratic politics” plays an instrumental role in shaping our nation. While mainstream politics may be at the core of this country, DUSU breathes at the core of this mainstream alignment. If we try to draw parallels between the two, the story may turn out to be much more similar than what we comprehend. The result of both political scenarios is the same: the common man and the common students are the ones who suffer.

Political campaigns and rallies are an important part of the “election culture,” but in a varsity that is as dynamic as DU, it becomes quintessential to address the solutions to the problems that are eroding its structure. When men climbed the walls of Indraprastha College for Women (IPCW) and Miranda House, or when a ceiling fan fell on a student of Lakshmibai College, the contesting student organisations did voice the students’ concerns, but only a few did, and those few completely took away the focus from the students to themselves.

Arguments may be presented that when any political outfit addresses a problem, it may get politicised, but when the parties and organisations clearly act in a way that adds to their advantage, I think we lose the main reason for even having elections and choosing the candidate that should have “represented students.”

So, when everyone around is so focused on the elections and the candidates, the question about the students is completely neglected. DU’s political atmosphere includes everything except for the concerns of the students. With or without the elections, most of the students of the varsity feel that it does not matter who comes to power, as they will be neglected either way.

Vijeyta Panjwani, a student of Miranda House, expressed that while organisations like the All India Students’ Association (AISA) and the Students’ Federation of India (SFI) pick up on student concerns, others like the National Students’ Union of India (NSUI) or Akhil Bharatiya Vidyarthi Parishad (ABVP) tends to be missing in action. However, the entire matter often gets politicised, and the focus shifts away from the core problem and the students.

The ones who stood up for Students

When things did not go as planned at IPCW’s annual fest Shruti 2023, a few student organisations did take up the issue and protested for it. The students at the college went through a traumatic experience. When asked about the entire thing, they do recognise the efforts that were put in by the political outfits, but at the same time, they felt that soon the matter became something that was only concerned with the politics and not what the men did with the students of the college or how some students were locked up or were asked to leave their own college while outsiders were still in.

However, the contesting candidates have a different tale to tell. While the students may feel neglected, according to these candidates, that might not be accurate, and as one of them expressed, “We are humans too. We can’t take up each and every problem, but try to take up as many as possible,” for which I can give them a little credit. Nevertheless, when we take a look at the broader picture, not everything meets the eye.

Aditi Tyagi, a SFI state committee member who is contesting for the general secretary’s position, explained that each issue that emerges in the campus space is political. According to her, the organisations work as a bridge to get the media focused on student issues, and in the process, it might look like that issue has been politicised. She believes that without these outfits, student issues might never come up. Aditya, a member of AISA who is contesting for the secretary’s position, on the other hand, said, “Issues did not get politicised earlier. Now they get as a result of the idea to dominate each issue under the current organisation that is in power.”

One side of the politics is all up to take up the student concerns, and though it comes at the cost of politization, the other side dictates a tale that is no less than blatant hypocrisy.

Will they Stand with the Students?

One does not have to dig into the past to see what went wrong when we take a look at organisations like ABVP and NSUI. The campus space has been engulfed with sloganeering, pamphlet throwing, and, of course, the endless SUVs and huge banners, and “coincidentally,” they all belong to just two of the outfits: ABVP and NSUI.

NSUI is a name that does not resonate with a lot of students on campus since, according to the latter, they were nowhere to be seen over the months. However, the organisation has claimed that they have always stood up for the students, especially women-centric issues, though they could not point out any specific incident other than the gruesome act that took place in Manipur. The question about the students of DU still hangs dry for them.

Hitesh Gulia, a NSUI member who is contesting for the president’s position, has a vision to resolve the issues of fee hikes and women’s safety and wants to start a global youth festival. When asked about their absence in comparison to other organisations, Gulia pointed out that they are the first ones who pick up any issue that arises in the campus, but he could not particularly pin-point anything concrete except for the OBE protest, which happened earlier last year.

If we take a look at the campaigning of the ABVP, firecrackers were burned in Shayam Lal College and Deshbandhu College, fights broke out in Ram Lal Anand College, Ramunujan College’s gate was broken, and male candidates broke into Miranda House; this may not be too appealing to earn the votes of the students. However, the organisation claims to function in the most democratic way and has assured that they were always and would be with the students, though they have also claimed with sheer confidence that no matter what, they would again come back to power.

While other organisations did express their “concerns” about how the ones in power do not resonate with students, intimidate them, and do not look like one of them, the ones in power stood by their seemingly “strong moral grounds.” Speaking with Ankita Biswas, who is a part of ABVP but whose nomination did not get clearance, she stated that the organisation works for the students around the year, irrespective of the fact that the students may feel otherwise.

When asked about the recent incident in Miranda House where ABVP members scaled up the gates, including herself, she explained, “Our supporters get enthusiastic, and in that moment, they might do such things. As for Miranda House, the administration made us stand out for over 1.5 hours and did not allow us to carry out our campaign, which is a part of this democratic process.” Ashish Kumar Singh, another ABVP member, further explained that, as per the directions of the organisation, they are allowed to take just three cars for three candidates in colleges for campaigning. When asked about it, Biswas remarked, “What is wrong with it?” Well, it is safe to say that ABVP’s supporters are a little too zealous, which “might have” caused a little too much trouble for the common students.

No matter which ideology an organisation is inclined towards, all of them have one thing in common, and that is their assertion that they are with the students and they will be with the students, irrespective of these elections. Students have, however, lost their confidence in this democratic practice, and as for me, I still had a few questions left, but all I got from the karyakarta (s) was, “Muddhe muddhe pe depend karta hai, ab mai kya hi karu?

Read Also: Under the Shadow of DUSU Elections: A Stage for Sexual Harassment and Caste-based Politics

Featured Image Credits: Ankita Baidya for DU Beat

Ankita Baidya

[email protected]

 

R.A. Podar College of Commerce and Economics is celebrating over 80 years of service, and in lieu of it, FINACC 2023 is scheduled to take place.


R.A. Podar College of Commerce and Economics (Autonomous) takes immense pride in celebrating over 80 years of dedicated service to education. As part of this celebration, they are excited to present the 9th edition of FINACC 2023, which is scheduled to take place from August 11th to August 12th, 2023.

FINACC is an Accounting and Finance-based event organized by the Accounts and Finance Circle of Podar. The primary goal of FINACC is to promote the subjects of Accounts and Finance in an enjoyable and engaging manner. Throughout the two days of the event, a series of activities will be conducted to provide participants with both entertaining and informative insights into the world of accounting.

The festival, under the Accounts and Finance Circle of Podar, aims to go beyond the regular curriculum and showcase various dimensions of accounting and finance. By doing so, they hope to help students realize the vast potential and possibilities that the field of accounting and finance has to offer. The forum also seeks to instill a love for accounting and finance among young minds while encouraging innovation and research through the sharing of ideas via events, talks, and group discussions with like-minded people, academicians, and scholars.

Some of the exciting events lined up for FINACC 2023 include:

Moneyball: A pre-event scavenger hunt that involves searching for accounting clues. Fundaz Apna Apna: A financial journalism event where participants get the chance to be evening news anchors. Quizz-o-counts: The flagship event that will test participants’ knowledge as quizzards. Crypto Conundrum: A surprise event centered around Crypto Currency. Business Analyst: An HR interview round for participants. Esploro Presentado: A research and presentation event. Between the Lines: A case study competition.

Team FINACC 2023 has put in considerable effort to communicate the importance of accounting literacy with enthusiasm and dedication. The event aims to engage attendees through a variety of activities and speaker sessions.

It is evident that FINACC 2023 promises to be an enriching experience, blending education and enjoyment to foster a deeper understanding and appreciation for the world of accounting and finance.

FINACC 2023 extends a warm welcome to educational institutions and prospective students from across the city to participate in this exciting event. The registration pages are now open, and further information can be found on the official Instagram page – @afcpfinacc

Read Also: The Good, Bad, and the NEP: A Far Dream?

Featured Image Credits: R.A. Podar College of Commerce and Economics

A student from Kamala Nehru College, University of Delhi, was beaten to death with a rod in Malviya Nagar after she reportedly refused the accused’s proposal for marriage.


A student from Delhi’s Kamala Nehru College was attacked with a rod in Malviya Nagar on Friday and died on the spot. The victim, identified as Nargis, was attacked outside the college premises.

According to the police, the victim came to the park with her male friend. The police have arrested her 28-year-old cousin named Irfan in connection to the murder.

The accused told the police that he was prompted to kill the victim after she refused his marriage proposal. His anger was compounded by the fact that no one was agreeing to marry him. He had allegedly been planning the murder for three days and surrendered to the police hours after committing it. The incident took place in a park near Aurobindo College.

As per the preliminary probe, Irfan had been upset after Nargis had stopped talking to him. Her family had refused to allow their marriage, partly because he didn’t have a proper job and worked as a food delivery agent. The victim, who used to attend stenography classes in Malviya Nagar, had completed her graduation just this year. Irfan had gone to the park today aware of the fact that she would cross while returning from her class. He called her in and said he wanted to talk to her and when she refused, pulled out a rod from his bag and attacked her.

After receiving the news, the Deputy Commissioner of Police (South) and senior police officials rushed to the site. They found a rod near the victim’s body and injuries on her head. The police are questioning the accused in connection to the murder.

The police said, “We received information that the body of a 25-year-old girl was found near Aurbindo College in South Delhi’s Malviya Nagar. An iron rod was found near her body. According to a preliminary investigation, the girl was attacked with a rod. Blood was oozing out from her head. Further investigation is in progress.”

A campaign, #JusticeForKNCStudent, has been launched online in support of the victim and calling out the perpetuation of crimes against women, with one user on Twitter writing,” Apathy of police admin. in responding to such cases& filing FIRs,& the nexus between the culprits, the state administration,& law enforcement agencies adds immensely to culture of Impunity wrt crimes against Women!”

 

Swati Maliwal, Chairperson of the Delhi Commission for Women, taking note of the incident tweeted, “In a posh locality like Malviya Nagar, a girl was beaten to death with a rod. Delhi is extremely unsafe. It doesn’t matter to anyone. Only in newspaper reports, the names of girls are changed, and the crimes do not stop.”

A senior police official, while talking to ANI, said,” The incident took place inside the park. The deceased is a college student. She had come to the park with her friend. There are injuries on the deceased’s head.”

Read Also: Rising Water, Sinking Hopes

Featured Image Credits: The Indian Express

Vanshika Ahuja

[email protected]

 

The implementation of ITEP and the elimination of other teacher training courses such as B.El.Ed courses by Delhi University without consultation is being contested by students and academics who think the program is unique in its own way and that introducing ITEP doesn’t require the elimination of other programs.

The All India Forum for Right to Education ( AIFRTE ) conducted a webinar on’ Introduction of ITEP and against the cancellation of B.El.Ed.’ on May 30, 2023 (Tuesday) at 7 pm. The discussion took place live on Zoom platform and was also broadcasted on Facebook and YouTube page of AIFRTE. The list of speakers included – Prof Krishna Kumar (Renowned educationist & Former Director, NCERT) , Prof Poonam Batra (Expert in Elementary Education & Co-creator of the framework of B.El.Ed, Prof Latika Gupta (Prof in Dept of Education, Delhi University) and Prachi Gupta (Student of B.El.Ed., DU). More than a hundred people participated in the live debate, with many actively sharing their opinions through the comments, including several B.El.Ed students and professors.

The backdrop of the discussion was the adoption of ITEP ( (Integrated Teacher Education Program) by the Delhi University Academic Council on 26th May, 2023 overruling objections raised by many elected teacher representatives, protesting students, and expert opinions.

ITEP was launched by NCTE ( National Council for Teacher Education ) under NEP 2020 scarping all the existing teacher training courses and to be adopted as the single course in the entire country. Experts have highlighted how it can weaker in terms of pedagogic training and how it is a threat to courses like  B.Ed. and B.El.Ed.

The conversation centred on the future of B.El.Ed programmes and how a systematic dismantling of prior structures and efforts to reform the education system is detrimental in many ways. It also emphasised the program’s values and how it helped the learning process.

Mr Jagmohan, the webinar’s host, began by introducing everyone. He also briefly stated how, from the commencement of NEP 2020, the main attack has been on how teachers will be prepared for it. Furthermore, it has now come down to teacher training for the same.

Prof Krishna Kumar, an experienced educationist and one of the oldest professionals to share his knowledge on the matter, opened the discussion.

At this point it is important to remember that B.El.Ed was born in struggle and has faced various struggles all along its short history of three decades. Some hurdles like the concept of elementary that was not easily digested at the time the program began. I remember how Prof Upendra Baxi steered the discussion with his great legal skills and was able to convince the council of what will the program do. Over time, it has faced various hurdles, but today we are facing a new kind of uncertainty.

– Prof Krishna Kumar

He mentions there are apprehensions on ITEP replacing courses like B.El.Ed but on the other hand there is a constant difficulty of faculty shortage. Prof Krishna Kumar states an important point the nowhere in the NEP policy it is mentioned that the ITEP will replace all the teaching courses, rather the general tone suggests that there will be multiple roots for teachers to be trained and prepared for jobs. This is not a threat to courses like B.El.Ed as it is well established and is widely accepted.

The university has underestimated the achievements and values of the program which has benefited both teachers and students. Delhi university has no dearth of colleges to start with its ITEP program, there is no point in killing one innovation to start with the other.

Prof Krishna Kumar

Later on, He highlights the importance of the course by saying that nobody else in teacher education have the kind of theoretical command and the insights in pedagogy like the B.El.Ed graduates.

Prof Latika Gupta then recounts her own experience with how the Course presented so many new concepts and how, despite the fact that the country has changed so much, the programme has maintained its true spirit and enthusiasm throughout its duration.

This course is an existence in itself, which drives all of us together. The recent graduates and students must overcome this round of crisis. Maybe this is an opportunity to re organize and start fresh.

Prof Latika Gupta

Several additional B.El.Ed students joined the discussion and highlighted how the degree empowered them and helped them to choose the finest ideas to share with the students. The programme serves as a model for not only imparting theoretical knowledge and training, but also building confidence and motivation to ask tough questions.

B.El.Ed has taught me how to make education more engaging and not boring, art and theatre has helped me in incorporating expression inside the classroom so that I could help my learners be more expressive and creative.

– A student who shared her experience during the webinar.

Prof Poonam Batra joined the conversation and expressed her concern about the teacher training course’s existential crises and how the elimination of such programmes might compromise children’s learning. She claims that teacher education is an easy target, and that if other higher education systems take the area, we are likely to lost the battle for our students. She recalls how well-crafted the curriculum was and how well developed its integration was, allowing for both interdisciplinary learning as well as theoretical and practical approaches of study.

The core subjects of B.El.Ed have significant contributions as it allows young students to revisit what they learnt in school and this time understand it from an epistemological viewpoint, It is about Knowledge generation and engagement.

– Prof Poonam Batra.

Another AIFRTE team member expressed his concerns about how the disintegration of the education system without consultation is an assault on the learning process, academicians, and students. He emphasises the importance of coming together to fight such acts. There is an increasing need to convey to individuals the consequences of such activities.

Mr. Jagmohan concluded the discussion by encouraging everyone to be optimistic and to participate in the struggle.

Link for full Discussion – https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=1221617085188263

Read also – https://dubeat.com/?s=B.El.Ed+

Image credits – News click, Google images

Priya Agrawal

[email protected]

The third-year students of The Third Act had claimed to have faced abuse by the convenor. However, the convenor denies the allegations and claims their disorderly behaviour was the reason for their suspension.

The recent events that took place in the dramatics society of Satyawati College spurred a row of accusations. In a conversation with the convenor, the professor informed that the college has not done anything. The third-year students have made a huge issue, which was not supposed to be, and due to the ruckus they created, they had to be suspended from the society.

The professor went on to inform us that the letter that was sent to the students, talked about the indiscipline that they created. He explained that due to the news that went up one-sided, the college has asked the students for clarification on the irregularities that have occurred in the dramatics society. The college has asked both the students and the convenor to respond to the same.

The chats that have taken place between the students, as claimed by the professor, has addressed the professor in a disrespectful manner by using only his first name. The professor also asserted that nobody has done anything with them. Just a disciplinary action has been taken against the third-years.

The students have claimed that they have been tortured and what not but nothing of that sort ever happened. Rather, there are chats where they have been completely disrespectful towards the teacher (me). 

-Convenor, The Third Act

Further, the professor has informed us that The Third Act page on Instagram is being run by a pass-out student, Nikhil Pandey. The admin was changed a few days ago after the fiasco erupted. Moreover, according to the professor, the letter-head that the students are using is not the correct one. The name ‘The Third Act’ is also not verified by the council yet, though the name was given by the convenor and a few other teachers in 2014-15. Before that, the name was ‘Sarang Natya Samiti.’ Back then, as claimed, the professors were new appointees and were not aware that the name must be verified by the council. Now the students are using a letter-head that is not verified by the college and it also consists of a contact of a student who is not even in the society.

The third-years are also claiming that they are being suspended from the college and they would be barred from sitting for the exams. However, as the convenor claimed, they have been suspended from the society only and nothing else.

According to the convenor, the cybercrime that the third years are claiming is not from the professor’s tenure. All of this came to light only after the students were suspended. When the Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) came to the convenor, it was signed by the students. The professor explained to them then that whatever they are doing might result in criminal offences and in the future, they should not indulge in anything of this sort.

As claimed by the convenor, the students tried to physically assault a second-year student. The convenor was an eye-witness, along with other two teachers. After the incident, they lodged a formal complaint.

I decided to suspend the students, which is my constitutional right as the students went against the disciplinary rules. Also, this suspension does not jeopardize their career, they have been simply suspended from the society. 

-Convenor, The Third Act

The professor went on to explain about the Rs. 8000 that has been taken from the college. He said that if the amount belongs to the college, even if any crime has taken place, it must be returned to the college. It is a government fund and it needs to be returned, no matter what.

The professor also claimed that irregularities in the bills have been found. The society went on to get clearance for a bill in Bihar in the accounts section without the prior knowledge of the convenor. They also went on for a competition in Chandigarh without informing the teachers. Moreover, claims of bills of November 2022 have been manipulated and are being shown in 2023. The convenor also claimed that there was a bill of Rs.7385 (approx.) of Muzaffarpur which is apparently a fraud. The bill is of a shop that belongs to one of the students. According to him, the advance bill settlement application is dated 23 March 2023 and 24 March 2023 but the bill submitted by the students is also dated 23 March 2023, which made the authorities raise an eyebrow. He also said that the students had gotten money sanctioned for the costumes and since those costumes belong to the college, they are supposed to be in the college to which negligence was shown.

Given the situation that the students were going to go in five days and I thought of doing something that would not be harmful for the students so I defunct the entire society. I did not even bother about the bills and finances initially but when they start misbehaving, I asked for the bills and then the irregularities in finances were realized.

-Convenor, the Third Act

Moreover, according to him the students issued MOU with the president’s signature, that too a scanned copy which is wrong and is supposed to be signed only by higher authorities. All in all, he claimed that the irregularities in the funds of the society made by the students are being highlighted because of their own actions. The college called the senior members on 4 May 2023 for clarifications on the matter. However, according to the convenor, the students did not come. Professor informed us that the students would be sent another notice in regard to the same.

Read Also: The Third Act Seniors Accuse the Convenor, Students Deny the Allegations

Featured Image Credits: satyawati.du.ac.in

Ankita Baidya

[email protected]

The third-year members of The Third Act have accused their society convenor of displaying atrocious behaviour. However, the other students of the college deny the allegations and claim the accusations to be false. Read ahead to find out more.

The third-year students of dramatics society of Satyawati College, The Third Act, have alleged that they have been facing an “atrocious behaviour” for the past couple of months. They have claimed that their convenor has been bullying them and the professor’s behaviour has gotten intolerable. The students have reported that they have been accused of financial frauds and have been threatened to be sent to jail. The students have further added that their convenor has asserted to shut the society as he wants everything to run according to him. Further, it has been claimed that a threat to fail the said students in their respective internals has been given by the convenor of the society. The students have reported that the reason behind the failure to organise their annual fest, “Pravaaz,” was because the convenor did not sign the Memorandum of Understanding (MoU). He was not present during the proposed dates and denied to take any responsibility for it, and did not assign any other teacher in-charge. It has been asserted that the convenor has been verbally abusing the students and has threatened to send letters to the parents of the students due to the behaviour displayed by them. However, the latter has rejected such an assertion against them. The third-year students have informed that the convenor has not held any formal meeting and whenever the former went for the same, they were always asked to sit in the Staff Room Lawns where rather than discussing important matters, they wasted 4-5 hours listening to their convenor’s personal stories.

The students have alleged that any decision in the college must pass through the Principal and the AO. However, the students have been suspended from their society at their convenor’s discretion and the latter can run the society as he wishes to while taking the juniors along with him for the same.

The third-year students have lodged a formal complaint against their convenor with the principal. However, they have been dismissed. Further, on knowing about the complaint, the third-year students asserted that the convenor called for a meeting with the second-year students and pressurised the first-year students for the same. It is alleged that the convenor had asked the first-year students to take back their signatures and pin everything on the third-year students. Moreover, the third years have claimed that their convenor made the second-year students sit with the first-year students to keep a check if the latter were recording him threatening them. The third-year students have put out a post on their Instagram handle calling out the entire incident and asking for help.

We seek only one thing and that is the removal of Dr. Pandey as our convenor. We will take legal action if college authorities don’t help us. We have been suspended without any reason and he is threatening our Juniors that he will debar us from college. He has threatened us that he will send letters to our parents. He is blaming us for financial fraud as well.” -Third year Students of The Third Act in conversation with DU Beat

While talking to other students from the college, they revealed that the third-year students wanted to organise an unofficial farewell at a farm house and it was decided that every member would be contributing some amount for the same. However, the amount that the members raised was not enough to cover the entire expense so the third-year students decided to take the remaining amount out of the society fund without the knowledge of anyone. They roped in a second-year student and tried convincing them to take the amount out but the student went on to talk to their batchmates first where the latter rejected the proposed idea.

The society fund is for the betterment of the college, to purchase lights and equipment, not for wasting it on a single night partying. If one wants to celebrate and party then they should be doing it with their own money.” – Student of Satyawati College

According to the student, things started getting escalated from this point. The annual fest that was supposed to take place got cancelled by the principal. The reason for cancellation was that none of the MoUs were signed by either the principal or the convenor. It carried just the president’s signature. The third-year members of the society asserted that they were given only a week’s time to prepare for everything since on the initial date the convenor was not available and did not assign any other teacher in-charge. However, the fest finally got cancelled again and according to the students, though they were dismissed on the grounds of MoUs not being signed by the concerned authorities and the failure to conduct any formal meeting, the former was not aware about this entire procedure.

The students from Satyawati College also reported that when bills had to be cleared in the accounts department, it was revealed that they were from Muzaffarpur, Bihar reportedly and were amounting to up to Rs. 7000 for coats, shirts, and pants. However, the students informed us that they wore their own clothes and the bills attached were false.

According to the bill, the blazer was of Rs.3500, the shirt costed around Rs.2000, and all of the items amounted to Rs. 7000. There was another bill for the tent that amounted to Rs.15000. The students had attached false bills. When all of this was questioned, the third-year students went into frenzy.” – Student of Satyawati College

Further, reportedly, there is a third-year student in the society who has Rs. 8000 from the society fund with them. On asking for the amount back, the student informed that a cyber-crime has taken place with them and hence was able to return only Rs.600 out of the Rs.8000 they had.

According to the students of the college, the third-year students have changed the login details of their E-mail and Instagram handle. They have started posting things on their own and are now falsely accusing the convenor.

Read Also: DU’s Dramatics Societies: Politics in Plays

Featured Image Credits: @the_third_act

Ankita Baidya
[email protected]

TW: Sexual Harassment

A sexual harassment incident is something which can leave an individual scarred for their entire lives. The least that could be done is to identify the accused and bring justice. The ICC of DU works in the same regard. However, it is found to be missing whenever such horrific incidents see the broad daylight. Why is ICC dormant when they are needed the most? Read ahead to find out more.


Basking in the morning sun while discovering the Delhi Metro and the joy of stepping into the college corridors brings a feeling of accomplishment. A transition from school to college brings with it a million of sacred dreams that can’t wait to be unraveled and rejoice the world stage. Somewhere it becomes the duty of the institution to protect those dreams and let the innocence cherish the moment in hand. However, a question of safety and security is a product of oblivion of these dreams.

Living in a city like Delhi, people do fear about their safety and security, especially women. Yet, they sleep at nights dreaming about the endless things they can do and achieve. Their dreams are not hindered by the question of safety but as soon as the Sun comes out, it becomes too obvious to think about it before stepping ahead. Hence, university remains the only place to live those dreams carefree. However, what if even the university becomes the place putting a question mark on one’s safety and security. What if University becomes the place which we term as “unsafe”?

In the recent months, it has become too obvious that the university is not providing a safe space in this regard. From the incident of Ramjas Debating Society to the scars of the festival of Holi, University of Delhi (DU) has put its DUites under the question of safety and security? It is true that as a woman we have to think about an endless list of things before stepping out of our residence. However, college is surely not the place where a student has to worry about these things but here we are, wrapped up in our thoughts of if going to a certain place will be safe for us?

A question of safety will always be present at the back of our minds but if a mechanism comes into place which redresses our concerns in regards to harassment then a sense of security can blanket the students and teachers of the varsity. One such committee is the Internal Complaints Committee (ICC) which addresses the grievances of students and teachers in regards to any form of sexual harassment. Now, the mechanism seems pleasing since the committee is present in most of the colleges and societies apart from a centralized committee of the varsity. The question arises when we take a look at its functioning.

When a Ramjas Debating society’s member was stripped off his credentials for alleged harassment or a student of DU had to face sexual harassment, where was the ICC at those times? Isn’t it the duty of ICC to keep the varsity a place free of harassment? Aren’t they responsible to spread awareness regarding the same? Where was it when such heinous crimes were unraveling themselves? There is an endless list of questions that need to be asked and answered for the scope of improvement of the safety and security of the campus.

In conversation with DU Beat, a member of ICC explained the functioning of the committee in DU. The member explained that the ICC expects the complainant to come forward or directly come to the office and give the committee a written complaint. Once the complaint reaches, it is taken up in a meeting. If the entire committee agrees on the authenticity of the complaint and if it falls under the jurisdiction of ICC then the complaint is taken forward. As this is the final step where the complainant can withdraw their complaint, ICC asks them if they want to pursue it or not. Once the ICC get their consensus, they are asked for 6 copies (as recommended by law) of the complaint. Then, as ICC is law bounded, they send the whole complaint to the respondent, without censoring anything, and give them a 10 days period to submit their clarification or response to the complaint. After this, both the parties are called in a manner where they don’t see each other and individual hearings take place. Then, ICC gives them a chance to call the witnesses which is followed by witness testimonies. At the end, the committee comes up with their findings and send them to both the parties involved. If nothing else comes up that could change the nature of the proceedings then the committee arrives at recommendations, and according to those, further actions are taken.

Since there are a lot of complaints at a given point of time and law has given us 90 days to resolve an issue, it generally takes 4-5 months to resolve a complaint.

-Member of ICC, DU

Upon asking about the reason behind the recent jump in harassment cases in the academic space, the member stated that it could be attributed to the pandemic where people did not understand the consequences of the things they do behind their laptops and mobiles. Further, the member claimed that the varsity has a persistent issue of gender sensitization. For the part of ICC, as the member claimed, it is taking more and more steps to make people sensitized about the gender, to make students aware about what is right and what is wrong.

The harassment cases haven’t increased exponentially but they have increased, particularly in the cyber space.

-Member of ICC, DU

Further the member added that there are certain guidelines issued by the ICC in regards to the recent trend of cases that are coming to the committee but it is difficult to enforce them at the grassroot level. Additionally, the member informed that the apex ICC has no jurisdiction over individual ICC of various colleges and hence cannot intervene in their matters. However, if the grievances of a student have not been resolved at the college level, they can directly write to the ICC of DU and then further steps can be taken in the case.

On asking about what if a particular ICC is not functioning properly, the member said, ”I can’t comment on it but you can ask the Proctor of the University. There are other mechanisms to address the issues related to the functioning of ICC of a college.”

When the question about how the ICC intends to improve its functioning was popped before the member, they responded by stating their wish to include more members. However, as they stated, the law has bounded ICC to include only 10 members.

As the member said that the ICC’s duty is to deal with the sexual harassment cases and the problem of gender sensitization only then, who is there to keep a check if the guidelines are followed or if a subordinate ICC is functioning properly? Just as the High Courts have a superintendence over all the subordinate courts, who is there to supervise the subordinate ICCs? What happens if a sexual harassment case is shut down for all the wrong reasons? Who is there to keep a check on the functioning of the redressal mechanism?

Read Also: The Story of the ICC

Featured Image Credits: newslaundry

Ankita Baidya

[email protected]

A sexual harassment incident can leave an individual scarred for their entire life. The least that could be done is to identify the accused and bring justice, something the ICC of DU works towards. However, it is often found missing when horrific incidents come forward. Why is the ICC dormant when it is most needed? Read for more.


Basking in the morning sun while discovering the Delhi Metro and the joy of stepping into the college corridors brings a feeling of accomplishment. A transition from school to college brings with it a million sacred dreams that can’t wait to be unraveled. Somewhere it becomes the duty of the institution to protect those dreams and let the innocence cherish the moment in hand. However, a question of safety and security is a product of oblivion of these dreams.

Living in a city like Delhi, people – especially women – do fear about their safety and security. Yet, they sleep at nights dreaming about the endless things they can do and achieve. Their dreams are not hindered by the question of safety but as soon as the Sun comes out, it becomes too obvious to think about it before stepping ahead. Hence, university remains the only place to live those dreams carefree. However, what if even the university becomes the place putting a question mark on one’s safety and security. What if University becomes the place which we term as “unsafe”?

In the recent months, it has become too obvious that the university is not providing a safe space in this regard. From the incident of the Ramjas Debating Society to the scars of the festival of Holi, University of Delhi (DU) has put its DUites under the question of safety and security. It is true that as a woman we have to think about an endless list of things before stepping out of our residence. However, college is surely not the place where a student has to worry about these things but here we are, wrapped up in our thoughts of if going to a certain place will be safe for us?

Read Also: St Stephen’s Displacement Causes Problems for Students

A question of safety will always be present at the back of our minds but if a mechanism comes into place which redresses our concerns in regards to harassment then a sense of security can blanket the students and teachers of the varsity. One such committee is the Internal Complaints Committee (ICC) which addresses the grievances of students and teachers in regards to any form of sexual harassment. Now, the mechanism seems pleasing since the committee is present in most of the colleges and societies apart from a centralized committee of the varsity. The question arises when we take a look at its functioning.

When a Ramjas Debating society’s member was stripped off his credentials for alleged harassment or a student of DU had to face sexual harassment, where was the ICC at those times? Isn’t it the duty of ICC to keep the varsity a place free of harassment? Aren’t they responsible to spread awareness regarding the same? Where was it when such heinous crimes were unraveling themselves? There is an endless list of questions that need to be asked and answered for the scope of improvement of the safety and security of the campus.

Read Also: Silencing Sexual Harassment: How DU Silences its Survivors

In conversation with DU Beat, a member of the ICC explained the functioning of the committee in DU. The member explained that the ICC expects the complainant to come forward or directly come to the office and give the committee a written complaint. Once the complaint reaches, it is taken up in a meeting. If the entire committee agrees on the authenticity of the complaint and if it falls under the jurisdiction of ICC then the complaint is taken forward. As this is the final step where the complainant can withdraw their complaint, the ICC asks them if they want to pursue it or not. Once the ICC gets their consensus, they are asked for 6 copies (as recommended by law) of the complaint. Then, as the ICC is law bounded with an external legal advisor, they send the whole complaint to the respondent, without censoring anything, and give them a 10 days period to submit their clarification or response to the complaint. After this, both the parties are called in a manner where they don’t see each other and individual hearings take place. Then, the ICC gives them a chance to call the witnesses which is followed by witness testimonies. At the end, the committee comes up with their findings and send them to both the parties involved. If nothing else comes up that could change the nature of the proceedings then the committee arrives at recommendations, and according to those, further actions are taken.

Since there are a lot of complaints at a given point of time and law has given us 90 days to resolve an issue, it generally takes 4-5 months to resolve a complaint.

Member of ICC, DU

Upon asking about the reason behind the recent jump in harassment cases in the academic space, the member stated that it could be attributed to the pandemic where people did not understand the consequences of the things they did behind their laptops and mobiles. Further, the member claimed that the varsity has a persistent issue of gender sensitization. For the part of ICC, as the member claimed, it is taking more and more steps to make people sensitized about the gender, to make students aware about what is right and what is wrong.

The harassment cases haven’t increased exponentially but they have increased, particularly in the cyber space.

Member of ICC, DU

Further the member added that there are certain guidelines issued by the ICC in regards to the recent trend of cases that are coming to the committee but it is difficult to enforce them at the grassroot level. Additionally, the member informed that the apex ICC has no jurisdiction over individual ICC of various colleges and hence cannot intervene in their matters. However, if the grievances of a student have not been resolved at the college level, they can directly write to the ICC of DU and then further steps can be taken in the case.

On asking about what if a particular ICC is not functioning properly, the member said, “I can’t comment on it but you can ask the Proctor of the University. There are other mechanisms to address the issues related to the functioning of ICC of a college.”

When the question about how the ICC intends to improve its functioning was popped before the member, they responded by stating their wish to include more members. However, as they stated, the law has bounded ICC to include only 10 members.

As the member said that the ICC’s duty is to deal with the sexual harassment cases and the problem of gender sensitization only then, who is there to keep a check if the guidelines are followed or if a subordinate ICC is functioning properly? Just as the High Courts have a superintendence over all the subordinate courts, who is there to supervise the subordinate ICCs? What happens if a sexual harassment case is shut down for all the wrong reasons? Who is there to keep a check on the functioning of the redressal mechanism?

Read Also: The Story of the ICC

Featured Image Credits: newslaundry

Ankita Baidya

[email protected]