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The second General Body Meeting (GBM) of Lady Shri Ram College (LSR) held on 26th August 2019, was centred around the college’s decision of installing CCTV cameras on the college campus. Mixed opinions surfaced as the event unfolded.

LSR witnessed the second GBM for the current academic session on 26th August 2019. After receiving great response from students as witnessed in the first GBM which discussed the change in the syllabus and its effects, the second GBM revolved around the recent step of the authorities to “put CCTV cameras in a huge number inside the college spaces”.

The discussion, initiated by the Students’ Union, put into light the issue of installation of CCTV cameras. As the meeting progressed, an enlarged spectrum of opinions was put forth. Two majorly conflicting opinions emerged as we asked the students about their take on the issue.

The first side brings into light the positive aspects which would follow if the college takes the step. This argument was supported as the students talked about the enhanced security and supervision in and around the college. It was further added that the CCTV cameras would reduce underlying violations and, in a way, would establish
transparency. Cameras would also serve as good sources of evidence collection in case of an incident or mishap of a severe turn.

A student who did not wish to be named said, “My first day of college did not turn out to be a delight as I wasn’t informed about the infamous back gate. I do not wish to say what happened but harassment does lurk around the back gate area. I would definitely feel safer if cameras are installed and hence, I support the move.”
Another student from LSR, Arpita, pursuing English Literature, said, “I would say somewhere or the other, students would be agreeing to it, (my remark is) not a direct attack on the facilities of the college, but the hype created for CCTVs is not worth it.” She further added, “Cameras can be used in a strategic manner to take into account the security of the students as well as the faculty, keeping in mind that right to privacy is not curtailed.”

On the other hand, some students did not support the decision of installation as they considered it as an invasion of privacy and not a very viable way of allocating the funds. Royina Chhabra, a first-year student says, “It is quite absurd that the college is concerned more about installing CCTV cameras inside the campus, whereas we all know the back gate is the place which needs more security measures and especially placement of police vans. CCTV cameras are something very secondary and not the need as of now. We have other things to focus on like sports equipment, more chairs, and better infrastructure.”

While we also see a leeway as some students suggest that the installation should be at places which are ‘strategically sound locations’, meaning the locations which walk along the demarcation of privacy and security. “In this way, funds can meet both ends, the near to death, panting fans, and the security concerns, both can be resolved hand in hand,” says a student who wished to remain anonymous.

DU Beat tried reaching out to the Students’ Union and the authorities, but received no response as they state that “matters are underway”. As the GBM progressed, a clear outcome could not be induced. Rather, it was put forth that the upcoming GBM would again draw light upon this very issue. It was further added that a petition or form would be circulated to the students to take into account their mandate. A concrete answer to the question of the conformity of installation of CCTV cameras and its judiciousness remains unanswered.

Feature Image Credits: Lady Shri Ram College Website

Priyanshi Banerjee

[email protected]

The English Department of the University of Delhi (DU) continues to be negatively affected by the Syllabus Controversy. 

The Executive Council of DU has approved the syllabus for English for the first semester, but this approved syllabus continues to be a mystery for not only the students, but also the professors. In fact, even the Head of the English Department, Professor Raj Kumar has not been made privy to the new syllabus. This continued delay with regard to the syllabus has now moved beyond ideological and ethical debates, and has started to negatively impact the students, causing mass worry and frustration across the University campuses. 

In most colleges, professors have started to teach the first-year students the old syllabus, but they are not sure about whether what they are teaching the first-year students is going to be relevant to them with respect to the upcoming examinations. Priyanshi Banerjee, a first-year student of English at Lady Shri Ram College, said, “No one seems to know anything about the new syllabus and this is causing a lot of problems for us first-years. Examinations are not going to get postponed, but considering the current slow pace of studies I don’t know how we are going to manage to complete our course work.”

Students are not even able to procure the books being taught currently because the bookstores in the college campuses are not stocking them, because of a lack of clarity with respect to the prescribed texts. Shyla Sharma, another first-year student of the English Department, said, “All of us are very anxious. It is very odd for us to see other department’s students going about their course work when we don’t even know what our syllabus is. Even the professors seem upset and lost, and this is causing a lot of confusion. We don’t even have all of our books yet, as we have been told not to buy them. I hope the syllabus is soon released.”

In spite of the mass tension, an academic debate in the midst of the syllabus controversy continues to flourish. Royina Chhabra, a first-year student of the English Department, said, “Restrictions are being put on our academic freedom. We should have a right to study what we want to, especially our history and culture irrespective of whether it is good or bad. How else are we supposed to learn and think for ourselves? This entire controversy is taking a huge toll on our education.” Many students also seem to be specifically upset about the negative debate with respect to the exclusion of the Queer Literature Paper. A first-year student of the English Department, who wanted to remain anonymous, said, “Queerness is a part of our lives. Section 377 no longer criminalises homosexuality, so why is our education system doing so? In fact, I believe that it is the responsibility of our education system to educate people about queerness because most people in India aren’t aware of, or comfortable about it. The fact that our new syllabus is probably going to be politically motivated and authoritarian in nature highly antagonises me.”

The Syllabus Controversy began when right-wing organisations like the Akhil Bharatiya Vidyarthi Parishad (ABVP) objected to the English Department for including certain study material relating to caste and gender in the new syllabus. Specifically speaking, they had an issue with the story Manibein alias Bibijaan in which the Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh (RSS) and the Bajrang Dal are portrayed negatively, with respect to the 2002 Gujarat riots, and the inclusion of the depiction of Hindu deities in queer literature by taking references from texts like Bhagvath Puran, Sankar Puran, and Shiv Puran. Counter-protests for academic freedom by organisations like the Delhi University Teachers’ Association (DUTA), Students’ Federation of India (SFI), All India Students’ Association (AISA), Krantikari Yuva Sangathan (KYS), and Pinjra Tod soon followed, leading to ideological and educational confrontations. This controversy has led to the syllabuses of many subjects not being released, even though the new academic year has already started. 

Feature Image Credits: Sriya Rane for DU Beat

Juhi Bhargava

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The 17-year-old Commonwealth Games gold medallist, Manu Bhaker has secured direct admission at the University of Delhi’s Lady Shri Ram College for Women where she is set to study Bachelor’s in Political Science through the sports quota offered at the University.

Ace shooter Manu Bhaker had applied for admission through the sports quota, enrolling herself for undergraduate education at the University of Delhi.

The University of Delhi is known as one of the finest meeting grounds for sports players from all fields, with a highly competitive spirit present in the space. Extremely qualified sportspersons find the University of Delhi as a ground to open up opportunities for them in activities and academics apart from their areas of expertise in sports.

The University’s guidelines for seeking direct admission under sports quota mention that sportspersons who have represented India in competitions recognized and funded by the Ministry of Youth Affairs and Sports (MYAS) will be given Direct Admission without Sports Trial. This includes competitive events such as the Olympics, Paralympics, Commonwealth and Asian Games amongst others.

Bhaker, who is an internationally acclaimed Indian face of shooting has won several awards in and outside India and had also been applauded by the Prime Minister Narendra Modi for her feats in shooting.

 

Featured Image Credits- Scroll

 

Amrashree Mishra

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The University of Delhi has released the fifth cut-off list today on the official website.

The admission under the DU 4th cut-off list ended ended on June 17th. The DU 5th cut-off list will be all about filling the seats in the reserved category in most colleges.

So far, the University has filled 67,419 seats out of the total 62,000. After the release of DU 5th cut-off, the admissions will take place from July 20, which will also be the first day for those who have already completed the admission process.

The candidates should note that this year, the university will notify just five cut-off lists.

Check this space for the latest updates on the fifth cut-off.

Click here to check the fifth cut-off list P.G.D.A.V. (E) College.

Click here to check the fifth cut-off list for Gargi College.

Click here to check the fifth cut-off list for Satyawati College.

Click here to check the fifth cut-off list for Shyam Lal College.

Click below to check the comprehensive fifth cut-off lists:

Arts & Commerce

Science

B.A. Programme

Only days after Hon’ble Minister of Finance, Nirmala Sitharaman, an M. Phil in Economics from the Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU) presented her maiden financial budget successfully, another Economics graduate from the University of Delhi (DU) has been entrusted as the next Managing Director and Chief Financial Officer of The World Bank Group, making her the first woman to hold this prestigious post.

Ms. Kant will be responsible for financial and risk management of the World Bank Group, reporting directly to Mr. David Malpass, Group’s President at Washington D.C. Her duties will include risk management and financial reporting and she will work with the bank’s CEO Kristalina Georgieva on mobilization of International Development Association (IDA),  WB and other financial resources.

As a student of the University, Ms. Kant has an Honours degree in Economics from Lady Shri Ram College and a post-graduate degree in Economics as well  from the Delhi School of Economics.

“Anshula brings more than 35 years of expertise in finance, banking, and innovative use of technology through her work as CFO of the State Bank of India,” quotes Mr. Malpass. 

“She’s excelled at a diverse array of leadership challenges including risk, treasury, funding, regulatory compliance and operations. I look forward to welcoming her to our management team as we work to increase our effectiveness in supporting good development outcomes,” he adds further. 

Over her three-decade long service at the State Bank of India (SBI), Kant rose significantly to emerge as the group’s MD by sheer hard work and dedication, as shared by her colleagues. Kant has also served as Chief General Manager of Mumbai SBI and was Deputy MD of Operations for National Banking Group. Appointed as the MD and member of the Board since September 2018, till the date of her superannuation in September 2020, Kant will now join the league of Aparna Subramani, Saroj Kumar Jha, Sumila Gulyani & other qualified Indian officials holding key positions at the IRDB or World Bank. Since 1965, Indians continue to form the tThird largest Ethnic group at the World Bank earning prestige and honor for the Indian soil, and aspiring millions to achieve such big feats. 

Ms. Anjula Kant is a fine paradigm of global Indian women who are excelling at Banking & Economy;, the likes of Arundhati Bhattacharya,  Archana Bhargava, Usha Ananthasubramanian, and Naina Lal Kidwai being some other worthy mentions, adding to the field’s foster for equality of opportunity. 

Ms. Kant is a huge inspiration for many students, especially those of Delhi University who aspire to achieve these great feat. 

Team DU Beat wishes her very best! 

Feature Image Credits: The Economic Times

Md. Faizan Salik

[email protected]

With less than 20,000 seats left to be filled in the University of Delhi (DU), the principals of colleges affiliated to the varsity said that the cut-offs for admission to courses will see a marginal decline in the third list, on July 7, 2019. According to the data shared by DU, 43,854 admissions have taken place after 778 withdrawals since the beginning of the process. The number of cancellations since the second cut-off stands at 3,082, as reported by India Today.

Check here for live college cut-off updates.

Click here to check the third cut-off list for Gargi College.

Click here to check the third cut-off list for Shaheed Bhagat Singh College.

Click here to check the third cut-off list for Satyawati College.

Click here to check the third cut-off list for Shri Ram College of Commerce.

Click here to check the third cut-off list for Vivekananda College.

Click here to check the third cut-off list for Shivaji College.

Click here to check the third cut-off list for Kirorimal College.

Click here to check the third cut-off list for Maharaja Agrasen College.

Click here to check the third cut-off list for Aditi Mahavidyalaya.

Click here to check the third cut-off list for Zakir Husain Delhi College.

Click here to check the third cut-off list for Ramjas College.

Click here to check the third cut-off list for Jesus and Mary College..

Click here to check the third cut-off list for Janki Devi Memorial College.

Click here to check the third cut-off list for Shaheed Rajguru College of Applied Sciences for Women.

Click here to check the third cut-off list for Mata Sundri College.

Click here to check the third cut-off list for Miranda House.

Click here to check the third cut-off list for Keshav Mahavidyalaya.

Click here to check the third cut-off list for P.G.D.A.V. College.

Click here to check the third cut-off list for Lady Shri Ram College.

Click here to check the third cut-off list for Hansraj College.

Click here to check the third cut-off list for Shyam Lal College.

 

Click below to access the comprehensive third cut-off lists:

Arts and Commerce

Science

B.A. Programme 

Feature Image Credits: Akarsh Mathur for DU Beat

Lady Shri Ram College for Women witnessed long queues during the admissions to first cut-off list due to lack of staff and technical issues. Volunteers played an important role throughout the process.

The corridors of Lady Shri Ram College for Women witnessed chaos and anarchy as students had a hard time during the admission procedure at the first cut off. The students who entered the gates on the first day of announcement of first-cut off list for admission to the college i.e. 28th June 2019 were stuck in the college premises till 8 p.m. after which the college declared that the admission procedure could not be continued. It was also observed that some applicants had to be stay back in the campus till 10 p.m. for completing the admission procedure. Candidates who couldn’t get admitted on the first day were compelled to report the next day and could only get admitted till 6 p.m. on 29th June 2019.

“Lack of proper execution was clearly evident as many students who got their tokens at 11 a.m. were done with the process. On the other hand, those who got their tokens at 9 a.m. kept waiting,” said Manvi Sharma, a student who witnessed the chaos herself.

Lack of staff involved in the admission process and frequent technical setbacks were cited as the primary reasons behind the colossal delay.

The outstation students had to face more problems as many had to search for an accommodation. Many missed their flights and trains, thereby obstructing their schedules. Leha, an applicant who resides in Greater Noida said, “My home is two hours away from the college. It’ll be extremely late when I reach home. The college must adhere to these issues while executing the admission procedure.

Parents had to wait for long hours which led to skirmishes between them and the administration. Rakhi, a parent who was present on the first day of admissions said, “My ward got her college enrollment form at 11 a.m. and was not able to get her admission formalities completed till 8 p.m. It was only the next day when the parents put forth their grievances, that the college followed a proper system.”

The volunteers were seen patient throughout the process. They addressed the grievances and assured both the applicants and their parents that the admissions would be completed at the earliest.

It is expected that the second cut off would unfold in a less chaotic manner unlike the first day of the verification process

Feature Image Credits: DU Beat Archives

Priyanshi Banerjee

[email protected]

Read on to get more insight into the course of Economics Honours provided in the University of Delhi.

  • What is the course about?

B.A. (Hons.)  Economics is one of the most sought-after courses, in both exclusively commerce colleges and those that offer other courses as well. It boasts of some of the highest cut-offs each year.

In terms of its syllabus, the course includes various papers on Microeconomics,Macroeconomics, and others like Development Economics, Indian Economy, Introductory Econometrics, Mathematical Methods for Economics.

On the other hand, papers such as Political Economy, Applied Econometrics, Financial Economics, International Economics, Environmental Economics, and others form the diverse range of electives.
The course has a special requirement that applicants must include Mathematics as one of
their best of four subjects.

  • What are some top colleges for this course?

Some of the most prestigious colleges for the course include Shri Ram College of
Commerce, St Stephen’s College, Hansraj College, Lady Shri Ram College for Women,
Hindu College, and Miranda House.

  • What are some good career options?

Many students who opt for B.A. Economics (Hons.) go on to pursue higher studies in Economics or
apply for Masters in Business Administration . Some go into academia. Many students are placed successfully in consultancy firms or public sector undertakings.

A large number of Economics (Hons.) graduates are also hired as statisticians, financial
analysts and in fields of public policy, banking and financial services. Actuarial sciences are
also an emerging field open to Economics students.Other allied fields that students of Economics can pursue include corporate law and financial journalism. Some also appear for civil service examinations.

  • Are there any notable alumni?

The course boasts of a network of highly accomplished and notable alumni. Many of
them have gone on to occupy important positions in a wide range of fields and professions.
Some of these include-
1. Arun Shourie, Economist, Journalist and former Union Minister
2. Gita Gopinath, Economist and Academician
3.  Kaushik Basu, Economist
4. Naina Lal Kidwai, Former Group General Manager of HSBC India and Former
President of FICCI
5. Vinod Rai, Former CAG of India

The 2018 cut-off lists for different colleges can be viewed on http://www.du.ac.in/cut-off.html

A thing that brings all the aspirants of the University of Delhi in this country to a sense of fascination is the University’s engagement with the performing arts. With a plethora of opportunities in fields like dance, music, dramatic, students are exposed to the discipline and the adventure of the arts that interest them. DU Beat brings to you the first of the six installations of its analysis of the top society in DU. The hard work was persistent, and the competition heartening. Let’s delve into who made the cut and how.

Methodology

The best college society in each category was selected by creating a tally of the top 3 positions that could be won at various events. The society that secured the 1st position was awarded 3 points, the society that secured the 2nd position was awarded 2 points, and finally, the society securing the 3rd position was awarded 1 point.

33 college fests were considered in the making of the tally. The selection of these 33 colleges was based upon an analysis done by speaking with members of numerous college societies, and tracking the fests they considered most prestigious. The considered colleges are:

Sri Aurobindo College (Morning)
Aryabhatta College
College of Vocational Studies
Dyal Singh College
Daulat Ram College
Delhi College of Arts and Commerce
Gargi College
Guru Gobind Singh College
Hansraj College
Hindu College
Indraprastha College for Women
Jesus and Mary College
Kamala Nehru College
Keshav Mahavidyalaya College
Kirori Mal College
Lady Irwin College
Lady Shri Ram College
Mata Sundri College
Maitreyi College
Miranda House College
Moti Lal Nehru College Morning
PGDAV College- Morning
Ramjas College
Ramanaujan College
Ram Lal Anand College
Satyawati College
Shaheed Sukhdev College of Business Studies
Sri Guru Tegh Bahadur Khalsa College
Sri Guru Nanak Dev Khalsa College
Sri Venkateswara College
Shaheed Bhagat Singh College
Shivaji College
Shri Ram College of Commerce


Top Three Positions

ECHO, the western music society of Jesus and Mary College, has won the best society accolade this time with 36 points. Euphony of Gargi College followed at the second position with 23 points, and the third position was tied between the western music society of Lady Shri Ram College (WMS-LSR) and Sound Machine of St. Stephen’s College with 15 points.

Points Tally: Western Music

The Winning Society at a Glance

ECHO, the western music society of Jesus and Mary College, is known to be a colossal army of 22 talented and strong women who thrive to share every inch of their soul through their musical oeuvre.

Jannis Joe, President, expressed her delight to DU Beat-  “It’s been one hell of a ride, and we would happily buy tickets to it again. Leading this dream team has been a complete pleasure and honour. I’m so grateful to have such passionate members who not only put their heart and soul into our piece, but also do justice to our vision. Honestly, I never could have asked for a better platform to echo our love for music. Thank you for giving me a larger than life experience.”

“Every member has literally put her blood, sweat, and tears into the making of this piece over months of diligent perseverance, right from the arrangement, to every part and every harmony. Apart from the wins, personally, our chief momentous achievement was the success of teamwork and the complete cathartic satisfaction of expressing ourselves while living every moment of our experience through our music, knit together as one. Thank you for this journey on such a brilliant platform,” shared Sara Joseph, Vice President.

They added, “This fest season was absolutely amazing and memorable. We are deeply touched and humbled by the tremendous response we got this year, and would like to thank and congratulate all the other teams for putting on a good show and fighting the good fight.”

Performing Members

Jannis Joe (President)

Sara Joseph (Vice President)

Akhila Sarah Mathew

Alisha Abigail Mohanty

Anisha Mathew

Anukriti Menon

Ashnita Ashwin

Blessy Jacob

Crystal Dessa

Dhanya Kuriakose

Faith Samuel

Hema Georgina Biswas

Khushi Pallavi

Michelle Masih

Prathibha John

Rency Verghese

Rhea Anthony

Samantha Elizabeth D’Cruz

Sanjana Kishore

Sharon George

Shincy Sara John

Srisha Sarkar

Winners Tally:

Out of the colleges included in the tally, ECHO secured victorious positions at the following college fests:

1st: Dyal Singh College, Delhi College of Arts and Commerce, Hansraj College, Kamala Nehru College, Kirori Mal College, Lady Shri Ram College, Miranda House, Sri Venkateswara College

2nd: College of Vocational Studies, Gargi College, Moti Lal Nehru College (Morning), Shaheed Sukhdev College of Business Studies

3rd: Hindu College, Indraprastha College for Women, Ramjas College, Shri Ram College of Commerce

Data Analysis and Compilation by:

Shivani Dadhwal

[email protected]

Anushree Joshi

[email protected]

Feature Image Designed by:

Palak Mittal for DU Beat

[email protected]

The row started with students being outraged after the panel allegedly attacked meat-eaters, using derogatory phrases like ‘they deserve to be beaten up’ and ‘them and their families will get cancer’.

 

Lady Shri Ram College (LSR), in collaboration with their National Service Scheme (NSS), had organized a seminar V4V (Valentine’s for the Voiceless), which led to a feeling of collective anger amongst the students because the talk was allegedly against the meat eating cultural minorities – the Muslims and the Dalits.

The panel consisted of Ambika Shukla, Director, Sanjay Gandhi Animal Care Centre, Devika Srimal Bapna, founder Kanabis- a PETA approved vegan footwear for women, and Divya Parthasarthy, founder, Tails of Compassion, shelter home for animals. The event was to be centered around the theme ‘Culture and Cruelty’.

Post the event, some students of LSR exhibited their strong displeasure as Shukla used words like ‘thrashing up’ and ‘bashing’ to describe what should be done to people who ferry cows and cattle for slaughter. According to the student(s), Shukla said, to quote, “How fashionable it is for media to report on Muslim and Dalit lynching, with respect to the beef ban, but no one talks about the gau-rakshaks giving up their lives for cows.” The debate ostensibly morphed into a karmic issue wherein Shukla said, “unko cancer hoga, unki family mai cancer phailega’”(they will have cancer, which will spread to their families as well) while talking about the non-vegetarians.

“I have never felt so attacked, offended and unsafe at my own college’s event,” was a student’s concern, who wished to remain anonymous. “It is an absolutely flawed understanding of more complex and layered issues,” said another.

There is also the concern of this issue not being taken as gravely as it should. “Either they (the people who are hushing-up the incident) are from NSS, and are insecure about their reputation, or they are really ignorant and fail to see how meat eating is a choice influenced by various demographics,” was a student’s take on the matter. “They might also be scared, considering what the present admin’s attitude is towards dissent.”

The NSS’s side of the story is quite contradictory wherein the say that the way tthe opinion was voiced was hurtful and disrespectful, and they have asked the students of the University of Delhi and outside to ignore the post. They said that the panelists have been misquoted, and the talk hasn’t been represented in a rational and factual manner.

‘On the bright side, I am glad the panel achieved what it sought to achieve,’ read a text from a volunteer. ‘It made people aware of the cruelty towards animals, and induced thinking.’

When the issue of the NSS’s image being maligned came up, they said that they did not, in fact, control what the panelists go on to say. The post has been reduced to a ‘hate message’ by the organisers.

‘Overall, the session reeked of privilege, both caste and class. They discarded food choices as an idea altogether,’ read a text that was circulated soon after. “It is just that a lot of us really felt insecure listening to a person justifying lynching people in the name of protecting a cow. And making this a white versus black debate portraying non-vegetarians as essentially bad is disrespecting the freedom to choose that all of us have,” an LSR student said.

NSS Union and concerned authorities have not released an official statement as of yet. The report will be updated once the Union comments.

What really happened is still in a shaded area because it was not reported by an external organisation, and there, still, seems to exist a dispute between the parties.

Feature Image Credits: DU Beat

 

 

Maumil Mehraj

[email protected]