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Student Journalism: More Than Just Reporting

Student journalism is much more than reporting events that take place around the campus. It deals with amplifying the voices of the unheard, holding authorities accountable for their actions and raising awareness on issues that remain in the shadows.


I remember during the summer of 2020, I was working on my biggest piece at DU Beat covering the internal functioning and problems of DU’s Debating circuit. It had already been an entire month since my research began when I called one of my former heads and started crying because of how overwhelming the entire process got for me. I had interviewed countless members and alumni of the circuit – some of which were supportive, some were indifferent, while the rest were downright furious. I received both praises and hate for chasing this story; was at times told that I was being courageous and at others that I was poking my nose where it did not belong. But in the end, regardless of how many people my story managed to reach, I know that my peers were proud of me, and a new zeal for journalism sparked within me.

People tend to assume student journalism to be just training grounds for individuals that wish
to pursue the field professionally. I beg to differ. I personally joined DU Beat as an escape from my college. I learnt here that student journalism is much more than reporting events that take place around the campus. It deals with amplifying the voices of the unheard, holding authorities accountable for their actions and raising awareness on issues that remain in the shadows. Student
journalism, beyond everything, requires an insane amount of courage. With the pandemic bringing a halt to physical classes and activities, students often risked their health in order to chase stories on-site in their own cities. Even post-reopening, I have observed certain correspondents stepping their feet in unknown waters, often with shady groups, just to fish first-
hand quotes for the readers.

With growing consciousness due to social media, in today’s world, one needs to be very careful with what they say on the internet. When you are a journalist, the stakes are higher. Every word written by the correspondent is subject to scrutiny at the hands of thousands of readers, and a single mistake can destroy your accountability. I once erred in editing a post I supervised
by ignoring the misgendering of an artist. Our former Sex Amma column, although started with
pure intentions, strayed from its agenda and received large criticism on certain grounds. Over the last three years I have spent at DU Beat, I have witnessed many mistakes and faced lots of backlash.

But, with every passing day, I see our team growing stronger, braver and more conscious of every action we take. And this is what it takes to be a student journalist. Every
time we share content out there, it is a fight – against authorities, against the evils in our society
and against the fear within us. Joining DU Beat was perhaps my best decision to date and I am
proud of every single member I have had the opportunity of working with for everyone has
displayed their own sets of values and strengths-helping me grow further. All the very best to the upcoming Editorial team. Stay courageous!

This piece was written for our former Web Editor for our Farewell 2022 issue, Print Volume 15, Issue 21. Remember to collect your latest print copy next Wednesday!

Read Also: Press Freedom in The Lives of Struggling Student Journalists

Featured Image Credits: Student Loan Hero

Aditi Gutgutia
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If you're looking for discussions on cinema, music, literature or pan-Asian food (or any food tbh)... Aditi will probably avoid your phone call but won't stop talking if you meet her in person.