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“…Will have many opportunities to come”: Delhi HC to a petitioner against DU’s 100% cutoff

A 12th Class Student moved to Delhi High Court to launch her grievances against the University of Delhi’s (DU) 100% cut-off mark which is stopping her to get into her dream college and course. Here is what the court has said to the petitioner:

The Delhi High Court dismissed a petition challenging DU’s undergraduate admission policy, saying that while different state boards may have evolved different methods of assessing class XII students, resulting in some variation in average results, this does not make the varsity’s admission criteria “manifestly arbitrary” enough to require the writ court’s intervention.

The court made the remarks in an order dismissing the plea, which sought a hold on UG admissions on the grounds that state boards’ grading systems were not consistent with the CBSE methodology approved by the Supreme Court. According to the appeal, whereas a huge number of students from state boards received 100 percent marks, just 550 students from CBSE received more than 99 percent.

As a result, the cutoffs in admissions for Delhi University colleges have increased to 100%, according to the petition, which also claims that the approach is inherently discriminatory towards CBSE pupils. The petitioner asked for a grading system that would equalize or moderate the grades earned by students from various examination boards.

The court, however, stated that the petitioner — a CBSE student who received 98 percent in Class XII but was unable to enroll in the course of her choice due to the 100% cut-off — has not been able to show any precedent in previous years that would support her claim that the university is required to consider differences in marks awarded by different boards when determining the cut-off for undergraduate admissions.

The youngster was also advised by the court that she had been accepted into a good college and a good programme. “There’s no need to be discouraged. If you desire to pursue Economics Honours, I am confident that you will be accepted into other colleges with your current grades. There are other additional colleges and universities in India. Please don’t be discouraged if you don’t get into a specific college. You are a young person with the rest of your life ahead of you. Take the possibilities that come your way and make the most of them,” it recommended to the petitioner.

In her case, the petitioner, an 18-year-old, stated that she applied to overseas universities and received offer letters from them, but that she preferred to study at Delhi University. She told the court that she had been accepted into Lady Shri Ram College’s BA programme, but that she intended to pursue a BA (Honours) in Economics.

“The petitioner’s grievance with regard to the assessment in the present year is also untenable. As a consequence of the pandemic and in a situation where it was impossible to hold examinations, the CBSE came out with an alternative scheme of assessment, which was in fact approved by the Supreme Court. The Supreme Court came to the conclusion that subject to incorporation of a mechanism for dispute resolution and a time frame, the scheme would be an appropriate manner of assessment.”

  • Said Justice Prateek Jalan in the order according to the Indian Express

In conversation with a recent 12th pass out who wanted to secure an admission in DU but hasn’t cleared the cut off of their desired course so far says,

When you dream of getting into one of the most elite institutions in India, being disheartened by the cut-off list is a given emotion I believe. Thinking of our batch and how we have marked maybe the best scenario marking scheme considering the situation we are in, but I also believe that somewhere some planning lacked, who lacked that planning I don’t know. An entire generation of people who were just access according to the marks they scored previously, and then getting admission in any college or University which disregards the fact to some extent that the fairness of marking lacked, I don’t know what to feel in a scenario where I have a decent percentage but still not a decent college.

DU Beat also had a conversation with a student from the batch of 2020 regarding the admissions who took a drop year and was supposed to appear for the admission cycle this year.

“I seriously believe that taking a break in this fast-moving and the ruthlessly competitive system is the biggest mistake I have committed. Well, thinking of marks, I did appear for all of my papers under normal circumstances and scored for what I reproduced in the answer sheet, but now that I am again sitting for admission along with those who didn’t appear in the papers in a standardized format I seriously don’t know that whether I am in an advantaged position or not.”

“When I say I didn’t get my dream college, I hardly think that anyone understands what pain I am in, because at the end of the day I am in a University whose cut-offs have made everyone cry at some point in time. Dreaming for a college is a but natural thing for any kid after his ruthless journey in school, but then also when you don’t get into one you desired, that feeling is somewhat indescribable. I also know that the University is also not a fault for releasing such unrealistic numbers, as students are getting admissions under that cutoffs, but I don’t know whom to go and complain to that I didn’t bear the fruit of all my hard work in school when I needed it the most.”

  • Says a student who got into their desired course in the first cutoff list but not in their desired college

The court stated that the petitioner — a CBSE student who received 98 per cent in Class XII but was unable to enrol in the course of her choice due to the 100% cut-off — has not been able to show any precedent in previous years to support her claim that the university is required to consider differences in marks awarded by different boards when determining the cut-off for undergraduate admissions.

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Digital Learning Magazine

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Abhivyakti Mishra

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Abhivyakti loves her coffee and spends her life on Google Docs while writing. She often finds herself in Chandler Bing's situation where she can pass a sarcastic comment instead of giving advice. Emotions amalgamated with observation is her treasure of self-expression.