Political landscape in DU

The Political Landscape In Delhi University

One’s political acumen takes a tangible hit when confronted with DU politics. By the time one believes to have understood its nitty gritty, the politics changes its form.

Political symbolism is at its full bloom around the rainy month of August. Pamphlets, flyers and posters seem to take over almost every wall, classroom, canteen and road. Even cars seem to flaunt their ‘poster-friendly’ being at you. During this time, the multi-layered being of politics becomes more than obvious. Class level, department level, college level and university level elections happen around the same time at the varsity.

At the university level, it’s a contest between the Akhil Bhartiya Vidyarthi Parishad (ABVP, the student wing of BJP), National Students’ Union of India (NSUI, the student wing of Congress), All India Students’ Association (AISA, the student wing of CPI M-L), Students’ Federation of India (SFI, the student wing of CPI M) and Chhatra Yuva Sangharsh Samiti (CYSS, the student wing of AAP) apart from other smaller parties. Calling this contest a microcosm of mainstream elections would be an understatement, as the number of voters in varsity is roughly the size of a Vidhan Sabha electorate.

The diverse forms of campaigning techniques make it clear that there’s no need to be a part of any political party in order to be political. Political speeches and deliverances become a common scene during the new session, with promotional hoardings acting as backdrops. You’re bound to find many on-the-move political pundits around the campus during this time. Unmissable is the insightfulness displayed by rickshaw waalas whose predictions about rain and elections never seem to go wrong.

Featured Image Credits : www.indianexpress.com

Sidharth Yadav
sidharthy@dubeat.com



Hits road cycling or gym when others party hard. A fitness freak with also interests in Politics, Literature and Philosophy, he is also an ardent traveller who defines travelling as a composition of heritage, language and markets and not just ‘food’ with has become a metonym for travelling nowadays. An English Honours student at Hindu College, he hates fiction but loves the subject because of its inter disciplinary nature.


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